Surbeck Annual Symposium

The Surbeck Annual Symposium celebrates Margaret Hart Surbeck Laboratory for Advanced Imaging research by showcasing presentations by the winning young investigators.

Surbeck Symposium 2013: Four Honored as Surbeck Young Investigators

Surbeck Symposium 2013

The move to more personalized medicine characterizes the research done by the four young investigators honored with the 2013 Surbeck Awards. Galen Reed, Myriam Chaumeil, PhD, Olga Tymofiyeva, PhD, and Gerd Melkus, PhD, presented their work at the seventh annual award ceremony on March 15, 2013 at UCSF Mission Bay’s Genentech Hall.

Sarah Nelson, PhD, director of the Surbeck Laboratory and Richard Gowen, PhD, president of the INDNJC Foundation, which supports the awards, presented the awards.

Congratulations to the 2013 Surbeck Scholar Award Winners!

Galen Reed

Reed and Chaumeil Win the Top Two Awards

Galen Reed took first-place honors for his abstract, “High Resolution C-13 SSFP Imaging with Hyperpolarized C-13, N-15 Urea.” Reed is working with mentor Dan Vignoron, PhD, and the Advanced Body Imaging Research Interest Group on a promising new method for assessing tumor metabolism and perfusion simultaneously in vivo. According to Reed, this study developed methods to acquire the first angiographic images at sub-millimeter resolution using a completely endogenous contrast agent. Unlike all current perfusion contrast agents which have some level of nephrotoxicity, hyperpolarized urea has negligible toxicity, making it a potentially safe angiographic agent or as a radiation-free perfusion marker.

Second and Two Tie for Third Place

Second-place winner Myriam Chaumeil, PhD, presented “Hyperpolarized [1-13C] aKetoglutarate: a Novel DNP Probe for Non-invasive Assessment of IDH1 Mutational Status in Glioma.” Chaumeil earned her PhD in Medical Physics from the University of Paris XI.

Gerd Melkus, PhD, presented “Using gagCEST and the CEST Effect of Iopromide to Detect pH Changes in Porcine Intervertebral Disc Specimens.” Melkus received his PhD in Physics from the University of Wuerzburg, Germany.

The research of Olga Tymofiyeva, PhD, is focused on structural connectivity in the brain. She shared third place for her contribution to “A DTI-based Template-Free Cortical Connectome Study of Brain Maturation”. Tymofiyeva has worked in the Xu Lab since 2010. She holds a PhD in Physics from the University of Wuerzburg, Germany and an MSc in Electrical Engineering from Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences.

The Margaret Hart Surbeck Laboratory of Advanced Imaging is dedicated to advancing imaging techniques for biological and medical applications. The Young Investigator Awards provide small grants for career development and are funded through the INDNJC Foundation honoring Margaret Hart Surbeck.

2012 Surbeck Young Investigator Award Winners

Five talented scholars earned awards at the sixth annual Surbeck Investigators Awards  presentation in 2012. They presented their work to an admiring audience in Genentech Hall, at an event moderated by Professor Sarah J. Nelson, PhD, director of the Surbeck Laboratory of Advanced Imaging and Richard Gowen, PhD, president of the INDNJC Foundation.

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Hu and Park Share First Place

Simon Hu, PhD, was recognized for “13C-Pyruvate Imaging Reveals Alterations in Glycolysis that Precede c-Myc-Induced Tumor Formation and Regression.” This paper describes the use of hyperpolarized carbon-13 technology to examine the metabolic consequences of switching a human ocogene on and off. Hu’s findings demonstrate that the distinct metabolic profiles of a transgenic mouse liver cancer model were highly correlated with corresponding genetic profiles.

Hu received his BS and MS in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University and his PhD from the UCSF/ UCB Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering. He is a postdoctoral scholar in the research group led by Daniel B. Vigneron, PhD.

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Ilwoo Park, PhD, focuses his research on developing imaging biomarkers for monitoring brain tumor response to therapy using hyperpolarized MR 13C metabolic imaging. His award-winning paper is titled “Evaluation of Heterogeneous Metabolic Profile in an Orthotopic Human Glioblastoma Xenograft Model using Compressed Sensing Hyperpolarized 3D 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging.” He is postdoctoral fellow in the Brain Imaging research group led by Sarah J. Nelson, PhD.  A native of South Korea, Park completed his undergraduate work at the University of California, Berkeley and earned his PhD in the UCSF/UCB Joint Graduate Program in Bioengineering.

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A Solo in Second Place

He holds a BS in Physics from the University of California, Los Angeles, where he worked in the Particle Beam Physics Lab developing high-gradient particle accelerators and free-electron lasers. He is enrolled in the UCB/UCSF Joint Graduate Bioengineering Program, where he has contributed to creating magnetostatic-based data processing programs for the analysis of magnetic resonance spectroscopy data for prostate cancer.

Tie for Third

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Myriam M. Chaumeil, PhD, earned a share of third place with her paper, “Longitudinal Evaluation of MPIOLabeled Stem Cell Biodistribution in Glioblastoma using High Resolution and Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging at 14.1 Tesla.” A postdoctoral scholar in the laboratory led by Sabrina Ronen, PhD, Chaumeil applies innovative magnetic resonance techniques, such as hyperpolarized carbon-13 and contrast-enhanced imaging, to characterize brain tumors and their response to treatments. She earned her PhD in Medical Physics from the University of Paris XI, where she developed new MR methods for the study of brain metabolism in normal conditions and in Huntington’s disease.Surbeck Symposium

Sharing third place, Kayvan Keshari, PhD, is a postdoctoral scholar in the lab led by John Kurhanewicz, PhD. His work focuses on developing novel magnetic resonance probes and engineered platforms to characterize abnormal metabolism for translation to both clinical diagnosis and drug discovery. His award-wining paper is titled “Hyperpolarized 13C Dehydroascorbate as an Endogenous Redox Sensor for in Vivo Metabolic Imaging.” Keshari holds degrees in Biochemistry and Applied Mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley and a PhD in Bioengineering from the University of North Carolina.

The Margaret Hart Surbeck Laboratory of Advanced Imaging is dedicated to advancing imaging techniques for biological and medical applications. The Young Investigator Awards provide small grants for career development and are funded through the INDNJC Foundation honoring Margaret Hart Surbeck.